Immigration Reform

/Immigration Reform
Immigration Reform2017-10-19T10:43:19+00:00

Immigration Reform

Resources:

Immigration Prayer    En Español
Basic Immigration Q & A       En Español
Activities You Can Do    En Español

Immigration and Catholic Social Teaching
A Basic Primer on Why Immigration Reform is Good for Everyone
Immigration Myths
Immigration and the Economy
Answering Tough Questions About Immigration

 

Bulletin Blurb for February 23

Immigration Reform

As immigration reform seems to stall in the House of Representatives, please communicate with your elected representatives about its importance and the need to see that it does not get lost. A personal call to your member of Congress would be a very effective way to communicate your concern about this issue. Here is a link you can use to find the phone number: http://www.house.gov/representatives/

If you tweet, please take this bulletin home and post the following message on Twitter:
Don’t forget #immigration reform. Fix broken system. @RepGuthrie @RepAndyBarr @RepHalRogers @RepEdWhitfield @RepThomasMassie @RepJohnYarmuth
Consider a similar message on Facebook and be sure to “like” our local Facebook page for immigration reform: Who is Your Neighbor?

 

Bulletin Blurb for February 16

Immigration Reform

Now is the time to “finish the job” on comprehensive immigration reform that will achieve the following goals:

  • A path to citizenship is not an amnesty–those who qualify would have to pay back taxes, a fine, acquire English proficiency, and wait their turn.
  • Family-based immigration would reduce current backlogs in family categories. Oppose transferring permanent visas from the family categories to the employment categories.
  • A temporary worker program would allow safe, legal entry and job portability while meeting the nation’s economic needs. Low-skill labor deserves appropriate workplace safeguards and an option to earn citizenship.
  • Address the root causes of migration and seek long-term solutions.

The Church does not oppose a piecemeal approach, as long as all the pieces are there in the end. For more information on immigration reform,  see www.justiceforimmigrants.org or www.usccb.org/mrs  (Source: “Becoming A Church that is Poor and For the Poor: A Catholic Message to Congress,” Catholic Social Ministry Gathering)

Bulletin Blurb for February 9

Immigration Reform

According to Kevin Appleby, Director of Migration Policy and Public Affairs at the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops: “…getting a fair immigration bill through the House of Representatives in an election year will be tough, requiring more political leadership and less political gamesmanship. It is achievable, provided all sides enter the fray in good faith and with a sincere desire to tackle the problem…Both sides will have to compromise and, believe it or not, work together to pass positive and humane legislation…The human stakes are high. If the President and Congress fail to repair our immigration system, immigrant families and communities – and the social fabric of the nation – will continue to break apart.”  (Source: http://www.cnn.com/2014/01/29/opinion/state-of-the-union-opinion-roundup/)

Let your elected representatives know that you value political leadership and bi-partisan efforts to fix the broken immigration system.  As Archbishop Jose Gomez of Los Angeles has aptly stated, our current immigration system is a “stain on the soul of the nation.”

Bulletin Blurb for February 2, 2014

Now is the Time for Immigration Reform

The Catholic Church supports comprehensive immigration reform. Specifically, the U.S. Bishops are calling for: a path to citizenship that is accessible and viable for the 11 million undocumented in the country; policies that preserve family unity as the cornerstone of our nation’s immigration policy, including a reduction in family backlogs and expedited processing for family reunification; a future flow worker program for low-skilled workers so they can enter the United States in a safe and legal manner; the restoration of due process protections so immigrants can have their day in court; and policies that address the root causes of migration, such as poverty and persecution.

Join the U.S. Catholic bishops in advancing immigration reform by contacting Kentucky’s members of Congress, especially in the House: Representatives Whitfield, Guthrie, Yarmuth, Massie, Rogers, and Barr. All six of these gentlemen need to hear from you and from those you can draw into this conversation.  For more information about the immigration issue, see Justice For Immigrants at www.justiceforimmigrants.org.

Bulletin Blurb for January 26, 2014

Immigration Reform

In remarks he made to a Los Angeles Rotary Club, Archbishop José Gomez of Los Angeles stated that Americans have to see “the human faces of immigration,” the children and families that are suffering under America’s “broken” immigration policy.  He stated that in the name of enforcing the law, our current immigration policies break up families and punish children for the mistakes of their parents. One out of every four persons deported are being taken away from an intact family.

Support legislation that will help to heal these ills.  Contact your legislators today about your support for comprehensive immigration reform.

Bulletin Blurb for January 19, 2014

Immigration Reform

Congress is back to work, and it is important to communicate our concern about the importance of immigration reform. According to Bishop Eusebio Elizondo, MsPS of the Archdiocese of Seattle, comprehensive immigration reform will lift immigrant families out of poverty and benefit the nation: “Immigration reform is a win-win for both immigrant workers and their families and U.S. citizens. Keeping undocumented workers in the shadows limits their ability to fully contribute to our economy and prevents them from climbing out of poverty. This harms the whole community, as immigrants and their children – the future leaders of our nation – miss the opportunity to reach their full God-given potential.” (USCCBLOG)

Please write to your elected officials. Go to Justice for Immigrants (justiceforimmigrants.org) and send a postcard or become a Faithful Citizen Advocate through the Catholic Conference of Kentucky.  Faithful citizens receive regular email alerts and are invited to communicate with elected officials through user-friendly formats. Go to ccky.org and follow the link in the “Welcome” message.

Bulletin Blurb for December 8

Immigration Reform

Please write to your elected officials to let them know of your support for immigration reform. Go to Justice for Immigrants (www.justiceforimmigrants.org) and send a postcard or become a Faithful Citizen Advocate through the Catholic Conference of Kentucky.  Faithful citizens receive regular email alerts about a variety of issues and are invited to communicate with elected officials through user-friendly formats. Go to www.ccky.org and follow the link in the “Welcome” message.

Bulletin Blurb for December 1

Now is the Time for Immigration Reform

The Church supports comprehensive immigration reform and urges you to contact your elected representatives to indicate your support.  Specifically, the U.S. Bishops are calling for: a path to citizenship that is accessible and viable for the 11 million undocumented in the country; policies that preserve family unity as the cornerstone of our nation’s immigration policy, including a reduction in family backlogs and expedited processing for family reunification; a future flow worker program for low-skilled workers so they can enter the United States in a safe and legal manner; the restoration of due process protections so immigrants can have their day in court; and policies that address the root causes of migration, such as poverty and persecution.

For more information about the immigration issue, see Justice For Immigrants at www.justiceforimmigrants.org.

Bulletin Blurb for November 24

Immigration Reform

One of the best ways to keep up with the immigration reform issue (and other issues of concern to the Church) is to become a Faithful Citizen Advocate through the Catholic Conference of Kentucky.  Faithful citizens receive regular email alerts about a variety of issues and are invited to communicate with elected officials through very user-friendly formats. Go to www.ccky.org and follow the link in the “Welcome” message.

Join the U.S. Catholic bishops in advancing immigration reform by following this issue and communicating when requested with Kentucky’s members of Congress, especially in the House.  See resources about immigration reform at www.ccky.org and www.justiceforimmigrants.org.

Bulletin Blurb for November 17

Immigration Reform

Immigration Reform

On November 7, Cardinal Timothy Dolan, on behalf of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, wrote a letter to Speaker of the House John Boehner that called upon members of the House of Representatives to address immigration reform legislation as soon as possible. Cardinal Dolan cited the ongoing suffering of immigrants and their families caused by a broken immigration system as well as the moral imperative of addressing this issue in a nation dedicated to liberty for all:

“As pastors, we [the bishops] witness each day the human consequences of a broken immigration system,” he wrote. “Families are separated through deportation, migrant workers are exploited in the workplace; and migrants die in the desert…As a moral matter, our nation cannot continue to receive the benefits of the work and contributions of undocumented immigrants without extending them the protection of the law. Keeping these human beings as a permanent underclass of workers who are unable to assert their rights or enjoy the fruits of their labor is a stain on the soul of the nation.”

Let your elected representatives know that you are concerned about this urgent issue.

Bulletin Blurb For November 10

Immigration Reform

SAVE THE DATE: The feast day of St. Frances Cabrini, the patron saints of immigrants, is this Wednesday, November 13. On this day, Catholics and all supporters of immigration reform are asked to honor St. Frances by calling their U.S. Representatives at 1-855-589-5698 to leave this simple message: Support a path to citizenship and oppose the SAFE Act.

The Safe Act is a concern because of its single-minded focus on immigration enforcement that will likely increase detentions and deportations and encourage racial profiling and unconstitutional detentions, without fixing any of the real problems of the broken immigration system.

Bulletin Blurb for November 3

Immigration Reform

SAVE THE DATE: November 13 is the national call-in day for Catholics to call members of Congress about immigration reform.  The day was chosen in honor of the patron saint of immigrants, St. Frances Xavier Cabrini. In 1946, St. Frances Cabrini was the first American citizen to be canonized. She came to the United States as an immigrant in 1889 and worked among the immigrant population building hospitals, schools, and orphanages with her fellow sisters in the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart.

On November 13 in honor of St. Frances Cabrini, callers will be asked to deliver this message to Congress: Support a path to citizenship and oppose the SAFE Act. The SAFE Act is a concern because of its single-minded focus on immigration enforcement that will likely increase detentions and deportations and encourage racial profiling and unconstitutional detentions, without fixing any of the real problems of the broken immigration system.

Bulletin Blurb for October 27

Immigration Reform: Frequently Asked Questions

Q:  Don’t immigrants take jobs from Americans?

A:  Immigrants do not compete with the majority of natives for the same jobs because they tend to have different levels of education and work in different occupations. As a result, immigrants usually “complement” the native-born workforce. That increases the productivity, and therefore the wages, of natives. Immigrants are also more likely to start businesses than the native-born. According to a 2011 report from the Kauffman Foundation, “immigrants were more than twice as likely to start businesses each month than were the native-born in 2010.” Immigrant-owned businesses employ millions of people across the U.S. (Source: Immigration Policy Center; www.immigrationpolicy.org)

Join the U.S. Catholic bishops in advancing immigration reform by contacting your legislator today.

 

Bulletin Blurb for October 20

Immigration Reform

A personal call to your member of Congress would be a very effective way to communicate your concern about the issue of immigration reform, which risks getting lost in the midst of the other issues. Here is a link you can use to find the phone number: http://www.house.gov/representatives/.

If you tweet, please take this bulletin home and post the following message on Twitter:

Don’t forget #immigration reform. Fix broken system. @RepGuthrie @RepAndyBarr @RepHalRogers @RepEdWhitfield @RepThomasMassie @RepJohnYarmuth

Consider a similar message on Facebook and be sure to “like” our local Facebook page for immigration reform: Who is Your Neighbor.

Bulletin Blurb for October 13

Immigration Reform

In a message, released in advance of the January 19, 2014, World Day of Migrants and Refugees, Pope Francis called for a “change in attitude’ toward migrants and refugees around the world, moving away from attitudes of “defensiveness and fear, indifference and fear,” typical of a “throwaway culture.” “Migrants and refugees are not pawns on the chessboard of humanity,” the Holy Father wrote. (Source: USCCB)

Join the U.S. Catholic bishops in advancing immigration reform by communicating with Kentucky’s members of Congress, especially in the House, and urge them to fix the broken system in the United States.

See resources about immigration reform at www.ccky.org and www.justiceforimmigrants.org.

Bulletin Blurb for October 6

Immigration Reform

One of the best ways to keep up with the immigration reform issue (and other issues of concern to the Church) is to become a Faithful Citizen Advocate through the Catholic Conference of Kentucky.  Faithful citizens receive regular email alerts about a variety of issues and are invited to communicate with elected officials through very user-friendly formats. Go to www.ccky.org and follow the link in the “Welcome” message.

Congress is in session.  Join the U.S. Catholic bishops in advancing immigration reform by communicating with Kentucky’s members of Congress, especially in the House, and urge them to fix this broken system.

See resources about immigration reform at www.ccky.org and www.justiceforimmigrants.org.

Bulletin Blurb for September 29

Immigration Reform

Please communicate with your elected representatives about the importance of immigration reform and the need to see that it does not get lost in the midst of other important issues. A personal call to your member of Congress would be a very effective way to communicate your concern about this issue.  Here is a link you can use to find the phone number: http://www.house.gov/representatives/

If you tweet, please take this bulletin home and post the following message on Twitter:

Don’t forget #immigration reform. Fix broken system. @RepGuthrie @RepAndyBarr @RepHalRogers @RepEdWhitfield @RepThomasMassie @RepJohnYarmuth

Consider a similar message on Facebook and be sure to “like” our local Facebook page for immigration reform: Who is Your Neighbor.

Bulletin Blurb for September 22

Principles of Immigration Reform

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) opposes “enforcement only” immigration policies and supports comprehensive immigration reform.  The elements of this reform include: 1) earned legalization allowing foreign nationals in good standing to obtain lawful permanent residence; 2)  future worker program, allowing foreign-born workers to enter the country safely and legally; 3) a family-based system that allows family members to be reunited, increases the number of family visas, and reduces family reunification waiting times; 4) the restoration of due process rights taken away by 1996 immigration legislation; 5) the need to  address the root causes of migration, such as underdevelopment and poverty in sending countries, to seek long-term solutions; and 6) the legitimate role of the U.S. government in intercepting unauthorized migrants who cross the border.  Increasing lawful means for immigrants to enter will allow the government to concentrate energy on those who truly threaten public safety.  Any enforcement measures should be targeted, proportional, and humane. (Source: “Catholic Church’s Position on Immigration Reform,” Office of Migration Policy and Public Affairs, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, August 2013.)

Congress is back in session. Please communicate with your elected representative today about the importance of these principles of comprehensive immigration reform.

Bulletin Blurb for September 15

Immigration Reform

Here are some informative and inspiring words from Archbishop Emeritus Theodore McCarrick of the Archdiocese of Washington in an opinion piece he penned for the The Washington Post:

“The comprehensive immigration reform legislation passed this summer in the Senate would invite undocumented workers out of the shadows and into the full economy. It would provide a path to citizenship, allow them to work without fear and ensure that they pay the full measure of taxes owed. It also would create a program offering future migrant workers — as many as 200,000 a year — an opportunity to obtain visas and enter the United States safely and legally. It would mandate the implementation of a national employment verification system to ensure that all employers play by the same rules.

Such reforms would level the playing field for all laborers in the United States, as the reforms are designed to eliminate, or severely reduce, the underground ‘off the books’ economy. The reforms would also help reduce our federal deficit by increasing economic activity and tax revenue. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office has estimated that the Senate bill would cut the deficit by $197 billion by 2023 and $700 billion over the next decade” (The Washington Post, September 1, 2013).

Congress is back in session. Please communicate with your elected representative today about the importance of comprehensive immigration reform.

Bulletin Blurb For September 8

Immigration Reform

Congress returns to work this week, and the push will be on to pass comprehensive immigration reform.  Please write to your elected officials to let them know of your support for immigration reform. Go to Justice for Immigrants (www.justiceforimmigrants.org) and send a postcard or become a Faithful Citizen Advocate through the Catholic Conference of Kentucky.  Faithful citizens receive regular email alerts about a variety of issues and are invited to communicate with elected officials through user-friendly formats. Go to www.ccky.org and follow the link in the “Welcome” message.

Please also visit the www.justiceforimmigrants.org  web site to see some new resources about the issue of immigration, including a video from Bishop William Medley (a former priest of the Archdiocese of Louisville) of the Diocese of Owensboro. Also visit and “like” Catholic Conference of Kentucky’s “Who is Your Neighbor” Facebook page to keep informed.

Bulletin Blurb for September 1

Immigration Reform

Congress returns to work on the Monday after Labor Day, and the push will be on to pass comprehensive immigration reform.  Please write to your elected officials to let them know of your support for immigration reform. Go to Justice for Immigrants (www.justiceforimmigrants.org) and send a postcard or become a Faithful Citizen Advocate through the Catholic Conference of Kentucky.  Faithful citizens receive regular email alerts about a variety of issues and are invited to communicate with elected officials through very user-friendly formats. Go to www.ccky.org and follow the link in the “Welcome” message.

See resources about immigration reform at www.archlou.org/immigration-reform.

Bulletin Blurb for August 25

Immigration Reform

One of the best ways to keep up with the immigration reform issue (and other issues of concern to the Church) is to become a Faithful Citizen Advocate through the Catholic Conference of Kentucky.  Faithful citizens receive regular email alerts about a variety of issues and are invited to communicate with elected officials through very user-friendly formats. Go to www.ccky.org and follow the link in the “Welcome” message.

Join the U.S. Catholic bishops in advancing immigration reform by talking with Kentucky’s members of Congress, especially in the House – Representatives Whitfield, Guthrie, Yarmuth, Massie, Rogers, and Barr – and urge them to fix this broken system. All six of these gentlemen need to hear from you and from those you can draw into this conversation.

See resources about immigration reform at www.ccky.org and www.archlou.org/immigration-reform.

Bulletin Blurb for August 18

Immigration Reform: Frequently Asked Questions

Why is immigration reform good for the states?

Our federal immigration system is broken, and now is the time for Congress to pass just and compassionate reform. Federal immigration laws and their implementation have profound impacts on state governments and residents, and state legislators and policymakers should support comprehensive immigration reform for a variety of reasons:

  • Comprehensive immigration reform will benefit the state’s economy.
  • Comprehensive immigration reform will save states resources spent on immigration-related activities.
  • Comprehensive immigration reform will make our communities safer and more secure for all state residents.
  • Comprehensive immigration reform will facilitate the integration of immigrants into our state.
  •  Comprehensive immigration reform will increase the overall education level of state residents.
  •  Comprehensive immigration reform will strengthen our state’s families.
  • Comprehensive immigration reform is in line with the values of our state.

For more information about each of the issues above, see the full article at www.archlou.org/immigration-reform. Join the U.S. Catholic bishops in advancing immigration reform by sharing information like this with Kentucky’s members of Congress, especially in the House – Representatives Whitfield, Guthrie, Yarmuth, Massie, Rogers, and Barr – and urge them to fix this broken system. All six of these gentlemen need to hear from you and from those you can draw into this conversation.

(Information provided courtesy of Jen Riddle of the Catholic Legal Immigration Network (CLINIC). For additional state-specific information, please see the Immigration Policy Center’s state-by-state fact sheets, www.immigrationpolicy.org).

Bulletin Blurb for August 11

Immigration Reform: Frequently Asked Questions

Does the Church’s support for illegal immigration reward law breaking?

The Church has always supported the right of a sovereign nation to secure its borders, although it should be done in a manner that protects human life to the greatest degree possible. The Church does not favor illegal immigration in any sense. It is not good for the migrant, who often suffers abuse by smugglers, exploitation in the workplace, and even death in the desert. It is not good for society or for local communities, because it creates a permanent underclass with no rights and no opportunity to assert them. That is why the Church sup­ports the creation of legal avenues for migration and legal status for migrants.

Thus, Church supports an earned path to citizenship that requires migrants to pay a fine and meet other requirements. Once the system is reformed, migrants should be able to enter legally and not be forced to enter or remain without legal status. The current law does not provide an adequate mechanism for legal entry, despite the need for their labor from which we all benefit.

Join the U.S. Catholic bishops in advancing immigration reform by meeting with or contacting Kentucky’s members of Congress, especially in the House – Representatives Whitfield, Guthrie, Yarmuth, Massie, Rogers, and Barr – and urge them to fix this broken system. All six of these gentlemen need to hear from you and from those you can draw into this conversation.

Bulletin Blurb for August 4

Now is the Time for Immigration Reform

During August and early September, Kentucky Congressional representatives will be home, and it is an ideal time to let them know of your support for comprehensive immigration reform.  Join the U.S. Catholic bishops in advancing immigration reform by meeting with or contacting Kentucky’s members of Congress, especially in the House: Representatives Whitfield, Guthrie, Yarmuth, Massie, Rogers, and Barr. All six of these gentlemen need to hear from you and from those you can draw into this conversation.

Specifically, the U.S. Bishops are calling for: a path to citizenship that is accessible and viable for the 11 million undocumented in the country; policies that preserve family unity as the cornerstone of our nation’s immigration policy, including a reduction in family backlogs and expedited processing for family reunification; a future flow worker program for low-skilled workers so they can enter the United States in a safe and legal manner; the restoration of due process protections so immigrants can have their day in court; and policies that address the root causes of migration, such as poverty and persecution.

For more information about the immigration issue, see Justice For Immigrants at www.justiceforimmigrants.org.

Bulletin Blurb for July 28

Now is the Time for Immigration Reform: Myth and Fact

Archbishop Jose H. Gomez, Chair of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops Committee on Migration and Refugees stated:  “The status quo of our current system causes much suffering among immigrants and their families and must end.”

There are many myths about immigrants and immigration.  One involves the perception that jobs are being taken away from citizens. Here are some facts about the job situation

  •  With immigration reform, newly authorized immigrants would produce enough new consumer spending to support 750 ,000 to 900,000 jobs.
  •  Every low-skilled, non-agricultural, temporary worker who comes to the United States to fill a job that may otherwise be left open creates an average of 4.64 U.S. jobs.  Low skilled jobs support the high skilled jobs.

For more information about immigrants and the economy, see resources at www.archlou.og/immigration-reform.

Join the U.S. Catholic bishops in advancing immigration reform by contacting Kentucky’s members of Congress, especially in the House: Representatives Whitfield, Guthrie, Yarmuth, Massie, Rogers, and Barr. All six of these gentlemen need to hear from you and those you can draw into this conversation.  You can find an electronic postcard to send to at the Justice for Immigrants’ homepage at www.justiceforimmigrants.org  The Catholic Conference of Kentucky (CCK) will be in Fancy Farm on August 3 emphasizing immigration reform. If you go there for a great meal, stop by the CCK booth to learn more.

Bulletin Blurb for July 21:

Now is the Time for Comprehensive Immigration Reform

Recently, Pope Francis tweeted: “We pray for a heart which will embrace immigrants. God will judge us upon how we have treated the most needy.” The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Justice for Immigrants (JEI) is currently working on behalf of the Bishops to help pass national immigration reform legislation that reflects our Catholic values.

At this time, a bipartisan bill (S. 744) has been passed by the Senate, and now legislation is in the hands of the U.S. House of Representatives. The Senate Bill, though not perfect, is supported by the Bishops and will allow 11 million people to emerge from the shadows of society, live without the fear of being separated from their parents or children, and work hard in order to fully realize their own American dreams.

Join the U.S. Catholic bishops in advancing immigration reform by contacting your legislator and sending an electronic postcard to Washington, D.C. The postcards may be sent from Justice for Immigrants’ homepage at www.justiceforimmigrants.org

 

KARINA HAS A STORY: WITNESS TO THE NEED FOR IMMIGRATION REFORM:

Karina is a Mexican immigrant who came to the U.S. about 8 years ago. She is the oldest of 6 siblings. Her mother provided for the family alone. Karina came to the United States on a tourist visa in order to help her mother pay for family expenses and medications. She also learned that in the U.S., a woman’s right to live free from partner violence is respected. She wanted her daughter to learn that she too has rights and value to society. So she stayed. Hear Karina tell her story on YouTube.

 

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